ABOUT US

Mission

Hamilton Native Outpost strives to provide a variety of adapted native plants and the knowledge to establish and maintain them for ecosystem restoration, wildlife habitat, grazing, and beauty in low-maintenance landscapes. Livestock adapted to the environment is a complementary enterprise.

How it came to be...

Rex and Amy Hamilton began harvesting, cleaning, and selling warm-season grasses in 1981; most of this seed was used to establish forage. In the mid-80's the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) created more demand for native grasses in an effort to reduce soil erosion. As they spent time in the fields and on the prairies harvesting native grasses, Rex and Amy began to take note of the wildflowers. They harvested their first wildflowers by hand in 1987; this part of the operation continued to expand from there. Today, Hamilton Native Outpost has several hundred acres of native grass and wildflower seed production; they also work with several private growers. Harvesting seed from Missouri's remnant prairies continues to be an important way for HNO's crew to learn about the plants in their native ecosystem as well as a valuable source of income for the prairie's owners.

Livestock are, and always have been, an integral part of the operation. The cow/calf herd is managed in such a way so as to complement seed production; at times, the cattle are used as a tool for managing the seed production fields. Herbivores have always been a part of the Midwest's grasslands, and, when managed properly, they can still be an important element. Hamilton Native Outpost also raises pastured pigs; they spend nearly all of their lives on pasture and are also used to manage seed fields.

PLANT INFO TABLE

PLANT PHOTO GALLERY

VISIT US AT OUR FIELD DAYS